Drug And Alcohol Rehab

Drug and alcohol rehab is a process wherein the patient undergoes a set of treatments, all of which are designed to train him or her away from dependency and towards personal freedom. Drug rehabilitation, also called “drug rehab,” is an umbrella term for medical and psychotherapeutic treatment for the abuse of psychoactive substances like alcohol, prescription drugs and street drugs like heroin, cocaine or amphetamines.

Drug rehabilitation, also called “drug rehab,” is an umbrella term for medical and psychotherapeutic treatment for the abuse of psychoactive substances like alcohol, prescription drugs and street drugs like heroin, cocaine or amphetamines.

Many drug rehabilitation programs strive to teach patients different methods of cooping in a drug free environment. The famous Twelve-step program encourage addicts not only to stop drinking alcohol or using other drugs, but to self-examine and alter the habits connected with the addictions. Many programs stress that recovery is an enduring process that has no end. For “legal drugs” like alcohol, complete abstaining rather than moderating – which can lead to relapse – is encouraged. Whether moderation is attainable by persons with a long history of abuse remains a debatable point, but it is a difficult task for any addict.

There are numerous programs that provide drug rehabilitation including: out-patient, residential treatment (in-patient), extended care centers, local support groups and half-way houses.

Drug rehabilitation is part of the criminal justice system. Those that are convicted of minor drug offenses can be sentenced to rehabilitation instead of jail, and people convicted of driving while under the influence of alcohol are required to attend Alcoholics Anonymous meetings.